The E-M1 Mark II is a complicated camera. It’s many configurable buttons and some configurable menus make it especially challenging. I really didn’t realize for several weeks after I got the camera that some of its menus were configurable. People would talk on one of the forums about setting a menu option and I would look it up on my cameras menu and not be able to find it. That was because I hadn’t configured the menu to offer me the option I was looking for. So, how to learn about all this stuff I was missing? I took the free and obvious first step of going to the Olympus web site and downloading the camera manual. It’s useful, and I recommend it. However, the typical Olympus translation to English always leaves something to be desired, and while it outlined all the camera settings, it usually didn’t explain what they did or how they worked. I still needed more information. I finally found it in a book called Mastering the Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II by Darrell Young. It’s available in Kindle format and hard copy. I’d recommend the hard copy because you’ll be using it as a reference work and flipping back and forth through it and that isn’t convenient with a Kindle. It’s also quite expensive. I have no connection to the author or to any location retailing that book. Just thought you should be aware that there is a book available that really does explain this complicated camera.

Just as an aside, did you know that while working in the menu system of the camera, pressing the INFO button on the back of the camera will bring up a little help screen providing more information on the menu choice you’ve currently hilighted?


The short answer is to definitely use sRGB:

https://kenrockwell.com/tech/adobe-rgb.htm

Good shooting,

English Bob

I've been having considerable luck with capturing moving subjects with my E-M1 mkii since firmware 3 was applied. I'm currently using the same settings for both BIF and ground animals. I'm working on the theory that even if the ground animals aren't moving when I start shooting they could move at any time, even if its just to turn their heads. The settings I'm using are as follows:

[SIZE=5][FONT=Open Sans]CAF+TR+2, 5x5 Points, Center Priority ON, Center Start OFF[/FONT]

[FONT=Open Sans]The larger and slower water birds are easy. The smaller, more agile or erratic like barn swallows are very hard for me though I [/FONT]
[FONT=Open Sans]suspect[/FONT][FONT=Open Sans] [SIZE=5]that my age and failing reflexes have more to do with it than the camera. [/SIZE][/FONT][/SIZE]

If you ever wanted to know what secret information your Olympus camera is recording about itself, including things like number of shutter activations, flash activations, failure codes and many other things, the procedures outlined here will tell you:

http://www.biofos.com/cornucop/hidden.html

Section 1 is mostly about the legacy cameras and Section 2 is mostly about the current cameras such as the OM-D series. If you choose to explore this information, be sure you have a fully charged battery in the camera and read the instructions carefully before you push any buttons.

As most of you know, if the focus of your lens is a little off, it can be corrected with an adjustment in your camera menu (menu A2-AF Focus adj on the O-MD E-M1 ii). Whether or not to do this has been a matter of interesting discussion on the other forum. A current and ongoing discussion of it is here;
https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/62842326

And an even better discussion of some time ago is here:
https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/59074490

Perhaps the shortest and easiest explanation of how to capture images of birds in flight with an O-MD E-M1 is here published by Olympus itself:[SIZE=5][/SIZE]

https://learnandsupport.getolympus.com/learn-center/photography-tips/birds/using-om-d-e-m1-mark-ii-focus-for-bird-photography

​I haven’t posted any pictures to the internet for the last ten years or so, so am out of touch in that respect. I believe I used to use Photobucket as a hosting site. Can anyone recommend any good hosting sites currently?

Some time ago I wrote lists of settings/instructions and explanations on how to set up the camera and FL-36/FL-50 flash to accomplish various lighting tasks. Those settings/instructions still exist and are in the Keepers section of this forum near the top. I'm pleased to find that the settings apply to the FL-900 flash unit and the current family of O-MD cameras. They probably apply to other Olympus cameras and flashes as well, but I haven't tested them.

https://forum.fourthirdsphoto.com/threads/19507-Suggested-FL-36-50-Flash-Setups

E9-18 f/4-5.6

by Guy Roberts

My current setup is an e5 with the following lenses: 7-14 f/4; 14-35 f/2; 14-54 mkii; 50-200swd; 50mm macro and 2x teleconverter.
Whan I travel I take only the 14-54mm, as I find the other lenses too big and heavy.
For this very reason I am thinking of going m4/3.
But thinking about it, the e5 is an excellent camera, takes images that I am very happy with, has less than 9000 shutter actuations, and is built like a tank.
So maybe a workaround would be to get the 9-18 f/4-5.6, used obviously.
With the teleconverter on the 14-54 I would be pretty much covered.
Looking on the net the 9-18mm lens seems to be holding its own price wise, around 300-400usd, depending on condition.
Anyone use this lens and have an opinion on it?

Will this lens fit an E5? I have the 14-35 and 35-100 F2 4/3 lenses for theater photography. Wondered if the 12-40 the E5 body, it might make a good in between lens. Or should I just get the old 12-60 F2.8-4 online used?